The batter for these 5-ingredient buckwheat crepes comes together in one minute in a blender and does not require resting before use. Lacy-textured and nutty in flavor, these gluten-free buckwheat crepes are so tasty and surprisingly easy to make, too!

A plate topped with an egg-and-gruyere filled buckwheat crepe.

I have been wanting to learn how to make buckwheat crepes since returning from Paris nearly 7 years ago. But having only had partial success with traditional crepes over the years, I felt intimidated by the idea of making them with buckwheat flour, which is gluten-free, and which I worried might require even more finesse to get right.

So when I came upon a recipe for buckwheat crepes in Phoebe Lapine’s new book, Carbivore, in which the process was described as something that “sounds intimidating” but is “actually quite easy,” I felt encouraged. Phoebe’s recipe calls for a mix of buckwheat flour and rice flour, and the batter, unlike that for many crepe recipes, does not require any resting before use.

I gave the recipe a go immediately and was shocked by how quickly the batter, which is essentially 5 ingredients, came together and how well the crepes turned out. I mangled a few initially, but once I found my rhythm — once I found the right amount of batter to use given the size of my skillet, once I learned the visual cues signaling doneness, and once I dialed the heat in properly — the process was easy.

Lacy and light in texture, these crepes taste nutty and earthy — buckwheaty!—and upon being reheated and filled with whatever your heart desires, they crisp up, too, and darken in hue. I find them irresistible, and I hope you will, too.

Buckwheat Crepes: Tips for Success

The crepe-making process takes a little bit of practice to get right, and you will likely make one or two bad ones before you find your rhythm. Here are my tips for success:

  • Use a digital scale to measure: It is the only way to ensure you are measuring accurately.
  • Use a nonstick skillet. I love this one.
  • Be patient. One place the process can go wrong is flipping the crepe too quickly. If the batter isn’t set and you try to flip it, you’ll be left with a mangled mess of partially cooked batter. Be patient, set a timer for 2 minutes, and look for the crepe edges pulling away from the sides before you flip.
  • Find the right amount of batter given the skillet you are using. If you use too much batter, the crepes will be too thick; if you don’t use enough batter; they’ll be too fragile. I find a heaping 1/3 cup to be perfect for my 12-inch skillet but you may need to use slightly more or less. 
  • Find the right balance of heat. You may need to adjust your burner throughout the process to find the right amount of heat. If it’s too hot, the crepes will get too crispy; if it’s not hot enough, you won’t get that appealing lacy-looking texture, which doesn’t matter from a taste perspective only a visual one. 

Carbivore

As noted, this recipe comes from my friend Phoebe Lapine’s new book, Carbivore, which is loaded with good information about carbs and why they’ve become so vilified and misunderstood over the years. In Carbivore, Phoebe teaches us that “carbs don’t have to be the enemy of [our] blood sugar or hormone health, nor are they the secret agents of inflammation.” All the dishes are completely gluten-free but easily adaptable to whatever pasta, bread or other carbs you have on hand. As a carb lover, this book speaks to my heart.

Carbivore.

Buckwheat Crepes, Step by Step

For this recipe, you’ll need both buckwheat flour and white rice flour.

A bag of buckwheat flour aside a bag of white rice flour on a countertop.

Additionally, you’ll need an egg, salt, water, and milk.

The ingredients to make buckwheat crepes measured out on a countertop.

Combine all ingredients in a blender.

A blender filled with the ingredients to make buckwheat crepes.

Blend until frothy and combined.

A blender holding buckwheat crepe batter.

Transfer to a smaller pourer — I like to use my 2-cup measure here:

A 2-cup liquid measure filled with buckwheat crepe batter.

Melt a teaspoon of butter over medium heat in a 12-inch nonstick skillet. I’m using this Le Creuset crepe pan.

A nonstick crepe pan on a stovetop with a teaspoon of butter in the center.

Add roughly 1/3 cup of the crepe batter — I find I need a heaping 1/3 cup to fill the skillet in a thin layer. Cook for about 2 minutes or until the edges separate from the sides of the pan; then…

A nonstick skillet holding buckwheat crepe batter.

… flip it. I find my hands to be the best utensil here… be careful/don’t burn yourself. Cook for another minute more.

A nonstick skillet filled with a finished buckwheat crepe.

Repeat with the remaining batter until…

A nonstick skillet filled with a finished buckwheat crepe.

You have a stack of crepes on your hands.

A stack of cooked buckwheat crepes on a plate.

This recipe yields 5 large crepes (plus a small one) but you can scale it up as needed.

A stack of cooked buckwheat crepes on a plate.

They will be paper thin.

A stack of cooked buckwheat crepes on a plate.

Transfer to an airtight bag and freeze for up to 3 months or use immediately as in the egg-and-cheese “galettes” below.

A large zip-top bag filled with buckwheat crepes.

Egg & Cheese Crepe (AKA Galette Complete)

In the States, if you order buckwheat crepes for breakfast, you’ll get something like the below-pictured ensemble. In France, they’re referred to as “galettes completes” or “galettes Bretonnes”.

Gather your ingredients: I’m using Gruyère, chives, and an egg.

Two cutting boards holding chopped chives and grated Gruyere cheese aside a bowl holding an egg.

To make one, return a buckwheat crepe to the skillet you used to make the crepes and set it over medium heat. Top it with some grated Gruyère cheese. Fry an egg in another skillet:

Two skillets stovetop: one holding a fried egg; one holding a crepe and some grated cheese on top.

Slide the egg onto the crepe:

An egg-and-gruyere filled buckwheat crepe in the process of being made in a skillet on the stovetop.

Fold the sides in:

A skilled holding an egg-and-gruyere filled buckwheat crepe.

Transfer to a plate and shower with chives or herb of choice:

A plate topped with an egg-and-gruyere filled buckwheat crepe.

Friends! These are fun. I’d love for you to try them.

A stack of cooked buckwheat crepes on a plate.
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A plate topped with an egg-and-gruyere filled buckwheat crepe.

Lacy Buckwheat Crepes (Gluten-Free)


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Description

Adapted from Phoebe Lapine’s Carbivore. 

Ingredient Notes:

  • For best results, use a scale to measure.
  • I am using this 12-inch nonstick crepe pan, which I love.
  • Salt: If you are using Morton kosher salt or sea salt use half as much by volume or the same amount by weight. Also: the original recipe calls for 1/4 teaspoon of salt, but I love salt and so am using a little bit more. Feel free to adjust the salt amount to taste. 
  • Milk: I use 2%; Phoebe says you can use whole milk or nondairy milk. 

Process Notes:

This crepe-making process takes some practice and you will likely make one or two bad ones before you find your rhythm.

  • Where the process can go wrong: flipping too quickly. If the batter isn’t set and you try to flip it, you’ll be left with a mangled mess of partially cooked batter. Be patient, set a timer, and look for the crepe edges pulling away from the sides before you flip.
  • Tip for success: Find the right amount of batter given the size of the skillet you are using. If you use too much batter, the crepes will be too thick; if you don’t use enough batter; they’ll be too fragile. I find a heaping 1/3 cup to be perfect for my skillet but you may need more or less. 
  • Final tip: Find the right balance of heat. You may need to adjust your burner throughout the process to find the right amount of heat. If it’s too hot, the crepes will get too crispy; if it’s not hot enough, you won’t get that appealing lacy-looking texture, which doesn’t matter from a taste perspective only a visual one. 

Ingredients

For the buckwheat crepes:

  • 1 egg
  • 68 grams (1/2 cup) buckwheat flour
  • 48 grams (1/3 cup) white rice flour
  • 3 grams (3/4 teaspoon) Diamond Crystal kosher salt, see notes above
  • 227 grams (1 cup) water
  • 124 grams (1/2 cup) milk, see notes above
  • butter as needed

For each “Galette Complete”:

  • butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 buckwheat crepe
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup grated Gruyère
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • finely chopped chives

Instructions

  1. Make the crepe batter: Place all of the crepe ingredients in a blender. Blend on medium speed until frothy and well combined, about 1 minute. The batter will be very thin. Transfer to a smaller vessel — I like to use my 2-cup measure here or transfer to a storage vessel and place in the fridge for up to 1 week.  
  2. Prepare the skillet: Heat a large (ideally 12 inches) nonstick crepe pan over medium heat to medium-high heat. Add 1 teaspoon of butter, let it melt, then swirl the pan to distribute it.
  3. Cook the crepes: (Read notes above before proceeding.) Pour 1/3 cup of the crepe batter into the skillet and quickly turn the pan to coat the entire bottom in a thin layer. If there are any holes, carefully pour a splash more of the crepe batter into the skillet to fill them. Cook the crepe until set, firm, and slightly pulling away from the sides, about 2 minutes. Run a large offset spatula along the perimeter of the crepe, then flip it in one swift motion — I find it easier to use my hands here to flip the crepes: carefully grab one edge of the crepe; then flip it in one swift motion. Cook the second side for another minute or until set, then transfer to a plate. Repeat with the remaining batter.

For the “Galete Complete”: 

  1.  In a small skillet, melt 2 teaspoons of butter over medium-high heat. Crack in an egg and cook until the white is set and the yolk is nearly cooked — I find covering my skillet helps the process move along. 
  2. Set the same skillet you used to make the crepes over medium heat. Add a small amount of butter (less than a teaspoon) and swirl to coat. Set a crepe in the skillet and cover the center with the cheese, leaving roughly a 1.5-inch border. When the cheese has melted and the crepe is just beginning to crisp, slide in the egg. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Use a spatula to carefully fold in the sides of the crepe to form a square.
  3. Transfer the galette to a plate and season with chives to taste. 
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Category: Breakfast
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: French, American